New NodeMCU Project: Garage Door Monitor

The Objective

For whatever reason, our garage door opener doesn’t work reliably when it’s cold. Only the remotes that are inside in the warmth actually work so we have to remember to close the garage from inside the house. Sometimes it’s forgotten and the garage door is left open. There’s no way to see whether or not the door is open from inside the house. Thus, this project came to mind.

The main objective is to create a wireless way to know whether or not the garage door is open.

The Planimg_20170126_190721

The plan is to use two NodeMCU boards. One inside the garage will talk to the other inside the house. The one in the garage will be connected to a limit switch which will be closed when the door is closed. The one inside the home will have some sort of indicator that will tell us whether the door is closed or not. This will likely just be a labelled LED.

These Two Don’t Like Each Other

I received the two NodeMCU boards in two weeks from China. The experiments trying to get them to talk to each other (one as an access point, the other as a client) did not work out. I went hours trying to get something going but I couldn’t, so I went back to something I knew already, which is to have it talk to some PHP code hosted on my website.

The NEW Plan

I wasn’t planning on having the internet involved but I actually think it’s going to be a better idea. This way, I can get something going with just one board and then integrate the second one into the project later. I can check the status of my garage door right from my phone’s web browser from anywhere. The future is here people!

 

The new plan has a couple phases.

Phase 1: Set up one NodeMCU in the garage with the limit switch. The switch will send the status to my website which I can then check to see the status of the door. I can use some PHP code to send me an email if the door has been open unusually long.

Phase 2: Have the second NodeMCU connect to my website and build hardware around it so that anyone that walks in the front door can see whether or not the door is closed.

Progress Update

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It’s been going pretty well so far, even with it’s problems. I’ve got two limit switches sending values to a MySQL database hosted on my website. (The full process: It accesses a URL with the switch values inserted into them, and then some PHP code on that page grabs them and inserts them into the MySQL database table.)

BTW, I am using the Arduino IDE to program the NodeMCU.

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I have no issues with it inserting values. The big issue I’ve been having is I haven’t gotten it running for longer than two hours at a time. I don’t know if it’s something on the server’s end or if the NodeMCU is hanging or something. It took me a while to get it to wake from deep sleep without doing something weird so I suspect it may have something to do with that. If this issue keeps going on, I may stop it from deep sleep and see how that goes. It’ll draw more energy but I’m leaning toward giving it a wall plug.

Keep Following the Project

I hope you enjoyed this first update post about my first NodeMCU project! Stay tuned for more!

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If you’ve got Instagram, follow me as I’ve found it to be an easy way to share progress updates as they happen.

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MWH Projects LED Foam Core Sign!

Happy New Year: Clean up time!

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I spent the last weeks of 2016 and the first weeks of 2017 cleaning up my electronics and projects storage areas. I’m happy with how most of my areas are now, especially my soldering work station pictured above. I moved the power supply from the main work table to the shelf above so now I have lots more room to work on. Of course, it would be nice to have more but it is what it is.

First project of 2017: MWH Projects Sign!

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I came up with this rather quick project for my first project for 2017. It would be a basic sign for my MWH Projects “brand” or whatever you may call it. The idea was to have nice clean lettering on a base with some LEDs. To make the letters, I printed out an outline of the MWH Projects text in Photoshop, taped it on some foam core, and carefully cut away at it.

The “MWH” was very easy since it’s all straight lines and large letters. The smaller “Projects” text was a little more difficult. I didn’t like the jagged rough edges so I soaked them in white paint. It gave the letters a rough texture but cleaner corners and curves.

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The base was a simple box made out of black foam core board. I hot glued on the “projects” text before working on the LED circuit.

There are three WS2812B LEDs in this project which are controlled by my Attiny85 breakout board. For power, I’m using 3-AA batteries and a step-up converter to get it up to 5V. I’m not sure if the step-up was necessary but, at the time, I wasn’t sure if I was going to be using 2 or 3 AA batteries.

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All of the parts fit nicely inside of the box, except for the battery holder which is stuck onto the back of it.

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And that’s it! I think it looks pretty nice, although the holes for the LEDs could be a bit cleaner.

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Speaking of the holes for the LEDs, I actually used a drill bit the size of the WS2812B round PCB modules. Leaving it like that, it wasn’t putting enough light on the letters so I cut a little more around them. I wasn’t sure I liked how the lights were showing on the letters but, after a while, I got used to it.

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I’ve been finding myself stuck on project ideas so I’m super glad this project worked out well.

Thanks for reading!