DIY Cork/White Board Mount

This post is brought to you by the letter T. (For “tape”.)

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I picked up this combination whiteboard and corkboard from Dollarama (a Canadian dollar store) a while ago and has been sitting in awkward places as I decided where to mount it properly. I decided that a good place to put it was where my desk originally had the built in CD rack (tells you how old this desk is!). The rack was made out of plastic and could be popped out easily.

Anyways, with lots of tape and a dowel, which was also purchased from Dollarama, I mounted it up on my desk.

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On the sections of tape where it makes contact with the dowel, I put another piece of tape to prevent it from sticking. This way, the board is able to swing out so that I can still use the space behind it to store things. Despite how cheap everything is, and the fact that there’s so much tape involved, I’m quite happy with how it turned out.

Hopefully it won’t turn into the thing that does bump in the night. 😛

The BIG opening update for the next Fountain Show

If everything works out in the very end, this will be one of my best projects to date. And really, with everything that has happened so far, it has been one of my best projects to date even if nothing actually works yet. I’ve experimented and learned a lot and, even with the bouts of wanting to quit, I really want this project to work because, again, it will be my best.

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I made a pool for the fountains out of scrap polypropylene sheets I got from work. I painted it all black because I thought it would benefit the lighting effects, as well as hide any imperfections better.

The white support beam running through the pool is where I would mount the fountain nozzles and LEDs.

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I’m trying my best to keep things organized and clean. I drilled holes for the pump wiring so that there wouldn’t be any excess wiring sitting in the water. I also used a silver marker to label them.

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Things started coming together as I had imagined. I used transparent tubing from the pumps to nozzles mounted on the support beam. The nozzles were made out of tubing that’s slightly more rigid. There’s also a smaller diameter tubing that I hot glued to the end to reduce the opening.

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Looks good so far…

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Heat shrink and electrical tape was good enough insulation with all of the water splashing every where. I decided to try another method of waterproofing certain connections which was to use short pieces of tubing and flooding it with hot glue on both ends. The connection in the picture is the splicing of the fountain wires to my own solid-core wire which is a likely point for failure.

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Once I was satisfied with the tubing, I threw on some more black paint.

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Next were the LEDs. They’re WS2812B modules (the little circle PCBs you find on eBay). I put them in little plastic cups to protect them from getting wet. They’re open on the bottomside but the LEDs are held inside of the cup with lots of hot glue anyway. I didn’t have any issues while testing them with water.

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And here’s where things started falling apart…

I barely ever used paint until recently, so I learned the hard way that it’s not very water proof, at least when applied on smooth plastic surfaces. As soon as the water started flying, the paint started peeling.

The other concern I saw was the aim of the fountains. The nozzles are round and are attached to a round support beam, so, while it looks good by eye, it didn’t turn out very straight. The pumps struggle if the fountain streams are exactly vertical so I tend to shoot them slightly backward so they sort of look vertical when viewing the fountains from the front. Anyways, I have some ideas on how to fix this which you’ll see in a future post.

The pump on the far left didn’t seem to respond so it either got through my quick dry tests before building or I fried it while setting up.

Also, no idea where the foam and bubbles are coming from…

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So clearly I’ve still got a lot of work ahead of me. Main things on the task list:

  • Scrape off all of the black paint on the inside of the pool. The outside black paint is fine.
  • Double check all of the pumps.
  • Replace support beam and nozzles.
  • Add a drain to the pool somehow.

Thanks for reading!

Maker Festival 2016

Last weekend, the Toronto Reference Library hosted the Maker Festival for another epic event and, for my third time, I volunteered to teach people how to solder. The way this event has grown is astonishing and it really was their best to date.

After I finished a morning volunteering shift, I took a tour around to see what exciting things were on display this year. Here’s a quick video I made of just a few of the things to see this year:

The entrance atrium was full of color this year, with hanging origami and streamers floating above the crowd. In addition, there was a smooth looking LED matrix and chaser LEDs lining the main staircase.

 

There are always grand demonstrations and displays. This year on the main floor was a sphere that just kept growing. I never got to see the final result though.

 

This was a project made by Steam Labs, a local makerspace. It’s like one of those High Striker carnival games where you smack a pad with a mallet as hard as you can. In this project, they used a force sensor and had people press it has hard as they could. I found it interesting because I had a similar concept in mind for a project… 🙂

 

It’s always great to see kids getting their hands dirty and having fun. The build-your-own-boat workshop and the accompanying boat race in the entrance water feature seemed like a hit once again.

For all of my pictures, visit the photo gallery on my website here: http://www.mwhprojects.com/gallery/Maker-Festival-2016

I expect to be back at the Festival next year. It’s become a life goal to have something on display there at some point… 😉