Adventures with surface mount soldering (and store updates)

IMG_0001Finishing up a soldering session with a pile of PCBs is so satisfying!

Over the past little while, I’ve been working on getting new products in my Tindie store, while learning new things and hitting a few speed bumps along the way.

Adventures in Surface Mount Soldering

When I started assembling the ATmega328p Breakouts that use surface mount components, I was excited to gain some experience working with SMT components. The first time I was exposed to surface mount soldering was back in my first semester of college where we used flux, solder paste, and a toaster oven to assemble some SMT kits. Hand soldering my ATmega boards, I realized quickly that it would be impractical for me to assemble every single one. To date, I’ve sold about half assembled and half as unassembled kits. In my time assembling all of those boards, I’ve picked up a few lessons.

My first lesson is that you’re screwed without flux, at least if you want decent looking joints. My method is to get the component on with any amount of solder, then throw some flux on it and hit it with the iron. It lets the solder flow again and makes a cleaner joint than if you were relying on the flux in the solder.

My second lesson is to use rubbing alcohol to clean up the flux residue, specifically 100% (or as close as you can) alcohol. I accidentally picked up rubbing alcohol that’s only 70% and it’s doing a poor job compared to when I was using something like 95% earlier. Still, with some aggressive wiping, and sometimes even rinsing the board with water, I can still get the boards looking clean.

My final lesson is to never go smaller than the size 0805. The capacitors I’m using on those ATmega328p Breakouts are 0603 and they’re the hardest components to put on. Of course there had to be two of them. In my new NCP1117 voltage regulator boards, I’m using 0805 capacitors and they were a lot easier to put on.

What’s New?

So after all that about surface mount soldering, I decided to go back to the basics with the ATmega328p Breakout Board and reintroduce one with just through-hole components. The ATmega328p Breakout Board BASIC is much like the original one I was using before I ever opened my Tindie store. I hope with less components and only through-hole components, the kit option will be more appealing to people. It’s also easier for me to put together too so I can get more assembled boards up quicker than I ever could with the original, which is now dubbed as the PRO version.

I also put up a couple of SMT breakouts, 0805 and SOT-223.

I’m working on a couple new board designs, and I’m also thinking of putting up some components I don’t need for sale. Stay tuned!

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